The Technology

Aadi Bioscience’s first product, ABI-009, nanoparticle albumin-bound sirolimus (rapamycin), a highly active form of sirolimus complexed with albumin, is based on the same technology as Abraxane® (nab-paclitaxel, Abraxis Bioscience, acquired by Celgene Corp in 2010 for ~$3B, 2017 sales $992M). The albumin-bound platform technology was invented and developed by Dr. Desai and colleagues at Abraxis.

Albumin is highly accumulated in tumor tissues, either due to the leaky capillary system and defective lymphatic drainage of tumors [1] or through an active gp60/caveolae-mediated transport process across tumor blood vessel endothelium [2, 3]. Importantly, albumin is taken up by proliferating tumor cells via endocytosis and macropinocytosis, then catabolized by lysosomal degradation to support de novo protein synthesis, energy, and tumor growth [4]. The accumulation of albumin in solid tumors provides potential rationale for albumin-based drug delivery systems to preferentially target tumors. The nab technology enables sirolimus to associate with albumin through non-covalent hydrophobic interactions to create a suspension of nanoparticles with a size of about 100 nm.

[1] Kratz F (2008). J Control Release 132, 171-183.
[2] Desai N et al (2006). Clin Cancer Res 12, 1317-1324.
[3] Minshall RD et al (2000). J Cell Biol 150, 1057-1070.
[4] Commisso C et al (2013). Nature 497, 633-637.

The Technology

March, 7 2019, Aadi Bioscience, Inc. (Aadi), For the first time in his life, Shanahan “Shanny” Dameral, 19, has a girlfriend. Soon, he’ll be graduating with a high school diploma and looking for his first job on the Kitsap Peninsula. What seems routine for many is a big deal for Dameral and other children living with treatment-resistant or intractable epilepsy. For reasons largely unknown, seizures in this subset of children persist long past their discovery in early childhood despite being treated with multiple medications and undergoing surgery to remove the affected parts of their brain. Diagnosed with epilepsy at age 5, life for Dameral has always come with seizures attached. When his seizures returned after a second brain surgery shortly after his 16th birthday, his mom Linley Allen, hoped for a medical breakthrough. “We needed to find something else since another surgery was out of the question,” Allen said. “We had heard about a drug being studied for a more severe seizure condition. I kept holding onto hope that it might be expanded to treat Shanny’s type of seizures because it was all we had at the time.”   See all and the original News article here: New Drug Trial Gives Hope for Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy